Welcome to the International Kiteboarding Association

 

Our Vision

To grow, evolve and promote the sport of kiteboarding across the globe and across all disciplines.

 

For more information please also visit our topic specific websites:

 

Formula Kite

The Formula Kite class is a high performance hydrofoiling class using regulated series registered production equipment freely available.

For Regional Games and a possible inclusion in the Olympic Games, one hydrofoil model and one kite model will be selected for a plain level playing field and to avoid an arms race.

 
 

KiteFoil GoldCup

The KiteFoil class is a full development class with minimal equipment limitation, allowing brands to test the latest equipment on the market.

The GoldCup tour is the sports premium event series with events all around the world and a strong focus on media production and prize money level.

 
 

Slalom

Slalom on TT:R (TwinTip boards) has been selected as the discipline and equipment for the Youth Olympic Games 2018 in Buenos Aires.

The focus of this high-octane discipline is on equipment handling and technique and includes reaching starts, reaching courses, and obstacels to jump.

 
 

Expression

The Expression Disciplines currently include Freestyle, Big Air, Wave Riding, Strapless Freestyle and Park. Competition is judged on difficulty and execution rather than "first past the post".

World Sailing, IKA and GKA have agreed to share the responsibilities for the Expression Disciplines with the Open World Titles awarded through professional tours.

 
 

Youth Olympics

Kiteboarding has been included in the 2018 Youth Olympic Games with a boardercross event on IKA TwinTip:Racing equipment, for boys and girls under 18.

Have a look here to learn more about equipment limitations, formats and qualification opportunities.

 
 

Olympic and Regional Games

The IKA continues to campaign for an inclusion of kiteboarding in the 2020 Tokyo Games and several Regional Games on One Design Kitefoiling Equipment.

The Formula Kite class is the only afforadable solution for emerging and developing nations to compete in high performance classes and ticks all boxes of the IOC requirements, especially for youth and media appeal.

 

Following up our article about possible political concessions in the decision making process for the 2016 Olympic Sailing competition, we want to take a closer look on ISAFs Olympic Commissions key requirements and the clear demands of the International Olympic Committee.

1.       Pinnacle Event

2.       Diversity

3.       Universality

4.       Youth and Media Appeal

Here we go:

1. Are the Olympic Games the Pinnacle Event for a certain event or class

ISAF is doing a lot to ensure that the Olympic Games are the pinnacle event for the Olympic Classes. This starts with preventing Olympic Classes to hold world championship events as they would like to and continues with the sailing world cup to ensure continuity between the Games. But this all doesnt help for events and classes where widely recognized pinnacle events exist outside the Olympic Games.

For Multihulls this will be the Americas Cup from now on, with racing taking place in huge catamarans. It is hard to believe that the Olympic Sailing competition, which has one of the poorest media distribution figures of all Olympic sports, can score against the multi-million-dollar media machinery of some of the richest syndicates in the world.

Another event affected by its pinnacle events is the keelboats, with a full on professional Match Racing World Tour for smaller keelboats as well as the Volvo Ocean Race and other offshore races being considered as the pinnacle of this part of the sport.

The other events – dinghy, windsurfer, kiteboard – are not affected by this criteria – for them the Olympic Games would be the pinnacle event where every athlete would be proud of having the chance to compete. Sure – in windsurfing and kiteboarding some pro tours exist, but they are not covering the disciplines that are happening at the Olympic Games – Racing, and they are by no means comparable with the America’s Cup or the WMRT or the Volvo Ocean Race.

Another issue to consider here is equipment evolution – the traditional Olympic Classes might have updated their sails and masts to keep up with the time at least a bit, but classes like Kiteboarding do just exist since 10 or 15 years, have cutting edge equipment using the latest available technologies, maximizing excitement for athletes, spectators and media, but the Star, the Finn and the 470 still believe they will “provide a perfect showcase of the wide range and diversity of sailing” ? Imagine Downhill Skiing with wooden skis , or the Cyclists being made to use bikes designed in 1911 – ridiculous.

2. Which Events show diversity as required by the International Olympic Committee

“Weight category events should not be allowed, except for combat sports and for weightlifting” – IOC Programme Commission. Not just “not recommended” or “not required”, but “not allowed” !

According to this pretty clear IOC requirement, there should not be two single handed dinghy events nor double handed dinghy events, neither for men nor for women. There should be a battle between the Laser, the Finn and any other class that wants to be selected as e.g. the Men’s single hander, or the 29er, the 470 or any other class that wants to be e.g. the women’s double hander.

Kiteboard, Windsurfer, Multihull and Keelboat (apart from their other problem with the requirements of the Olympic Commission) are all unique in their area: Kiteboards are different from any other sailing class as they neither have a mast nor a sail but a kite and steering lines and the hulls sink if not moved; the windsurfers have swivel mounted riggs and the athletes have to stand on their boards, multihulls have – as the name says – more than one hull and keelboats have keels. Dinghies – or better said “centreboard boats” are dinghies, and it doesn’t make a difference if the ideal weight of the crew is 60, 80 or 100 kg.

By the way, this requirement of the IOC Programme Commission has been published under the auspices of Jacques Rogge, an avid Finn sailor...

3. Are the current and possible future events and classes youth and media appealing

When talking about media appeal, one should not talk about media appeal for the sailing audience – they are going to watch the Olympic Sailing competition anyway (or, probably not even them).

What the IOC is especially interested in is added media coverage for the general interest audience plus increasing ticket sales for live spectators. Both cannot be achieved through the sailing audience alone, what is needed is “Waking up an Audience” as outlined by Richard Worth (Chairman, Management Board of the Americas Cup Event Authority), and this requires to move “from the Flintstone generation to the Facebook generation“.

He was further referencing to the new, successful additions to the Winter Olympics, namely Snowboard Cross: “Kids come charging over mountains on snowboards, making leaps, and it looks both different and interesting."

Kiteboarding exactly represents this new generation attitude which is rather looking for videogame-style action sports than for traditional leisure activities. Nowadays, Sailing has to compete for the youth’s attention against all the new, exciting and accessible action and fun sports like skateboarding, wakeboarding, free climbing – just to name a few – and kiteboarding is one of the very few discipline of today’s sailing that is seen as cool and youth attractive.

This claim can be easily backed up by media distribution figures for regular kiteboard events: 400 hours TV coverage in general interest TV like news shows with a reach of 600 million viewers, 35 million readers in newspapers and magazines as well as 70000 spectators on the beach are just one example for the media and spectator interest for a normal kiteboarding event.

4. Do the events and classes chosen offer development options especially for emerging nations

When comparing Sailings strength and weaknesses against other (water) sports, then one comes to the conclusion that youth and media appealing boats and TV coverage is not the only problem for sailing in the Olympics. The problem is the low participation in number of countries, and especially from emerging countries where money is an issue. Skiffs, Multihulls and Keelboats all seem to be equally irrelevant to solve that problem.

The only solution to expand sailing activities in emerging nations is to support single handed events solely, maximizing participation in Olympic Qualification as demanded by the IOC and drastically reducing costs.

Firstly, single handed equipment is generally cheaper than all the other events, this applies to classes like the Laser as well as for Kiteboarding and Windsurfing. Logically also the campaign costs are significantly lower: While a four-year campaign for a 470 costs estimated 140000 Euro (4 boats, 5 sail sets per year,3 extra spinnaker and jibs per year, centre boards, masts...) and for a Tornado estimated 110000 Euro (2 boats, 2 sail sets per year, 2 centre boards, 2 masts, 4 beams, 4 trampolines...), these costs are still inaccessible for athletes or teams in emerging nations.

Taking the example of kiteboarding, a campaign would be as cheap as 22000 Euro for a four-year campaign (4 boards, 3 kites per year, 3 bars with lines per year). Plus, the kite industry is keen to support Olympic campaigns in emerging nations with equipment – something which is only possible with initially low equipment costs.

And the equipment costs are only a part of the total cost for an Olympic Campaign: adding travel costs (yes, equipment may be provided at major events, but to qualify for those events athletes still need to travel with their own equipment) and sail test programmes only multiplies the original costs of the equipment, and in general cheaper the initial costs, the cheaper the whole campaign.

Only Kiteboards, Windsurfer and single handed dinghies can score here, while all other events fail to deliver – apart from the fact that the bigger boats need additional slipways (which are not widely existing in emerging nations) or marinas (which are even harder to find) – infrastructure that adds prohibitive costs for these events.

The ISAF council in less than two weeks time has been given the lead to do something out of the ordinary, to make a decision that might excite a new generation of sailors to get on the Olympic campaign trail. To borrow a phrase from another recent vote between old and new:

“Yes, you can !”

   Top Rankings Racing

Formula Kite (Foil)

 

KiteFoil Open

 

TT:R Slalom

 

Speed

male Oliver Bridge  United-Kindom                 male Maxime Nocher  Monaco                 male Narapichit Pudla  Thailand                 male Robert Douglas  United-States   
female Stephanie Bridge   United-Kindom      female Elena Kalinina  Russia      female Jingle Chen  China      female Angely Bouillot  France   

   Top Rankings Expression

Freestyle

 

Big Air

 

Wave

             

Strapless

 

Park

male Posito Martinez  Dominican-Republic                   male Posito Martinez  Dominican-Republic                  male Pedro Matoz  Brazil      male Matchu Lopez  Cape-Verde                  male Sam Light  United-Kindom   
female Estefania Rosa  Brazil       female Bibiana Magaji  Slovakia      female Ines Correia  Portugal      female N/A       female Karolina Winkowska  Poland   

Latest Pictures

Latest Riders Action on Instagram